Newman’s Theory of Doctrinal Development

An Online Course with interactive Q&A via Zoom

Newman’s Theory of Doctrinal Development

An Online Course led by Dr. Bud Marr, Director, National Institute for Newman Studies

St John Henry Newman’s Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine (1845) is arguably the most important work ever written on that topic. Within the Essay, Newman argued that later articulations of doctrine, when accepted by the universal church, represent not corruptions but organic developments of the original deposit of faith. Since the Essay’s publication, Newman’s theory of development has become widely accepted by both theologians and ecclesiastical authorities. Today, church historians take for granted the idea that doctrine develops. Nevertheless, vigorous debate persists regarding the question of how to discern between an authentic development and a “mis-step,” or corruption. This course will provide an in-depth study both of Newman’s original Essay and also its reception in subsequent decades. The course will conclude by looking at key case studies in order to test how Newman’s theory works in practice.

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Online Gathering Dates and Assignments

Ryan J. Marr

Instructor
Ryan J. Marr

National Institute for Newman Studies

Ryan (“Bud”) Marr is the Director of the National Institute for Newman Studies and Associate Editor of the Newman Studies Journal. He has a strong personal interest in Newman—a result of the instrumental role that Newman’s thought played in his conversion to Catholicism. Marr has authored several other publications on Newman’s theology, including a book-length treatment on Newman’s understanding of the Church.

Ryan J. Marr

Registration
Newman’s Theory of Doctrinal Development

Office: (412) 681-4375 (note that we have limited hours due to COVID-19). Email office@ninsdu.org if you have questions. 


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